Questo sito si serve dei cookie per fornire servizi. Utilizzando questo sito acconsenti all'utilizzo dei cookie - Maggiori Informazioni - Acconsento


Atik
Coelum Astronomia
L'ultimo numero uscito
Leggi Coelum
Ora è gratis!
AstroShop
Lo Shop di Astronomia
Photo-Coelum
Inserisci le tue foto
DVD Hawaiian Starlight
Segui in diretta lo sbarco di Philae sulla Cometa
Skypoint

Vai indietro   Coelestis - Il Forum Italiano di Astronomia > Scienze Astronomiche > Esobiologia
Registrazione Regolamento FAQ Lista utenti Calendario Cerca Messaggi odierni Segna come letti

Rispondi
 
Strumenti della discussione Modalità  di visualizzazione
Vecchio 11-12-06, 23:30   #31
Planezio
Utente Esperto
 
L'avatar di Planezio
 
Data di registrazione: Jan 2003
Messaggi: 2,763
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

Quote:
LongJohnVargas
Questo link parla del progetto Longshot, un astronave interstellare in grado di essere spinta da un motore nucleare ad Elio3 verso Centauri B in 100 anni.

Affascinante.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Longshot

Ah, ho capito, non iusciamo neppure a fare la fusione controllata per scaldarci d'inverno (l'ultimo passato al feddo dovrebbe far pensare un po') ma progettiamo astronavi che siano spinte da un motore che non abbiamo, nonsapremmo come fare, non abbiamo neppure una linea di ricerca "promettente" da seguire.
Molto afffascinante. Ma questo punto, fantasia per fantasia, perchè nonil "motore a curvatura" di Star Trek? Pare sia migliore...
Planezio non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 12-12-06, 17:34   #32
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Red face Re: Alpha Centauri

In Italia non sanno gestire l'energia. Ci sono scienziati straordinari ma lo stato non permette lo svilupo di progetti energetici. Non lo promuove, anzi lo ostacola, per i motivi che conosciamo bene, ovvero "pagano meglio le tangenti le industrie già esistenti rispeto a quelle che ancora non esistono".

Fuori dall'Italia le cose son diverse. I motori a curvatura ancora non vengono presi in considerazione, ma ad esempio il motore ad Americio di Carlo Rubbia mi pare un progetto solido, seppure esistente solo a livello di progetazione. Pero sai ci sono centrali nucleari che producono energia. Potrebbero produrne anche per mandare un pompelmo in orbita plutoniana. Non mi sembra così strano.

LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Links Sponsorizzati
Astrel Instruments
Vecchio 03-02-07, 16:35   #33
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri


Daedalus probe arriving at Barnard's Star.
Credit/copyright: Adrian Mann
One of the first detailed design studies of an interstellar spacecraft.1 Conducted between 1973 and 1978 by a group of a dozen scientists and engineers belonging to the British Interplanetary Society, led by Alan Bond, it demonstrated that rapid, unmanned travel to the stars is a practical possibility. Certain guidelines were adopted: the Daedalus spacecraft had to use current or near-future technology, be able to reach its destination within a human lifetime, and be flexible enough in its design that it could be sent to any of a number of target stars. These guidelines ensured that the spacecraft would be practical, that those who worked on the project might live to see it achieve its goals, and that several stars could be investigated using the same type of vehicle.

The selected target was Barnard's Star, a red dwarf lying 5.9 light-years from the Sun. Although the Alpha Centauri system is closer, evidence available at the time (now considered unreliable) suggested that Barnard's Star might be orbited by at least one planet. To reach Barnard's Star in 50 years (the flight time allotted in the study), a spacecraft would need to cruise at about 12 percent of the speed of light, or 36,000 km/s. This being far beyond the scope of a chemical rocket, the Daedalus team had to consider less conventional alternatives. The design they chose was a form of nuclear-pulse rocket, a propulsion system that had already been investigated during Project Orion. However, whereas Orion would have employed nuclear fission, the Daedalus engineers opted to power their starship by nuclear fusion – in particular, by a highly-efficient technique known as internal confinement fusion. Small pellets, containing a mixture of deuterium and helium-3, would be bombarded, one at a time, in the spacecraft's combustion chamber by electron beams and thereby caused to explode like miniature thermonuclear bombs. A powerful magnetic field would both confine the explosions and channel the resulting high-speed plasma out of the rear of the spacecraft to provide thrust. By detonating 250 pellets a second, and utilizing a two-stage approach, the desired cruising speed could be reached during an acceleration phase lasting four years. Daedalus first stage Daedalus would be constructed in Earth orbit and have an initial mass of 54,000 tons, including 50,000 tons of fuel and 500 tons of scientific payload. The first stage (shown left) would be fired for two years, taking the spacecraft to 7.1 percent of light speed, before being shut down and jettisoned. Then the second stage would fire for 1.8 years before being shut down to begin the 46-year cruise to Barnard's Star. Since the design made no provision for deceleration upon arrival, Daedalus would carry 18 autonomous probes, equipped with artificial intelligence, to investigate the star and its environs. The 40-meter diameter engine of the second stage would double as a communications dish. On top of the second stage would be a payload bay containing the probes, two 5-meter optical telescopes, and two 20-meter radio telescopes. Robot wardens (shown below) would be able to make in-flight repairs. A 50-ton disk of beryllium, 7 millimeters thick, would protect the payload bay from collisions with dust and meteoroids on the interstellar phase during the flight, while an artificially-generated cloud of particles some 200 km ahead of the vehicle would help disperse larger particles as the probe plunged into the planetary system of the target star. En route, Daedalus would make measurements of the interstellar medium. Daedalus warden Some 25 years after launch, its onboard telescopes would begin examining the area around Barnard's Star to learn more about any accompanying planets. The information thus gathered would be fed to the computers of the probes, which would be deployed between 7.2 and 1.8 years before the main craft entered the target system. Powered by nuclear-ion drives and carrying cameras, spectrometers, and other sensory equipment, the probes would fly quickly past any planets looking especially for any signs of life or conditions favorable for biology.
LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 03-02-07, 16:38   #34
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

The nearest star system to the Sun; it lies at a distance of 4.395 light-years (1.349 parsecs) in the constellation Centaurus. Alpha Centauri consists of two reasonably Sun-like stars orbiting closely about each other and possibly a third, red dwarf star, much further out. The two brightest components, A and B, revolve around each other once every 80 years and are separated by about 25 astronomical units (3.75 billion kilometers, or 2.3 billion miles). Alpha Centauri A is a yellow G star similar to the Sun but about 1.5 times as bright; B is a smaller, orange K star with about half the Sun's luminosity. The third possible member of the system, Proxima Centauri, is a red dwarf, about 7,000 times fainter than the Sun, which, if it is truly associated with the main pair, moves in a very wide orbit with a period of millions of years.

Whether or not the Alpha Centauri system contains any planets is undetermined but there has been much speculation about how, if it did, a planet would have to move in order to have the best chance of supporting life.1, 2, 3 If it circled widely around either A or B, it would not only lie outside the habitable zone of either of these stars but be subject to complex gravitational influences which would tend to destabilize its orbit. An even wider path, on the other hand, that took a planet around both main stars, might be stable but would fall even further outside the habitable zones. The best chance for life (as we know it) might be on a world which circled closely around A or B and enjoyed similar levels of light and warmth to those on Earth. To an inhabitant of such a world, the other star would appear about 1,000 times brighter in the sky than our Moon and be visible for half the year in the daytime and half the year at night. A and B would make a striking color contrast of orange and yellow, while Proxima would appear as a dim red point of light barely visible without a telescope. See also Orion, Project.


ABProximaSpectral typeG2VK1VM5VeApparent magnitude-0.011.3511.01Absolute magnitude4.345.7015.45Luminosity (Sun=1)1.5190.5000.000138Mass (Sun=1)1.1000.9070.1Temperature (Kelvin; Sun=5770)579052603040Radius (Sun=1)1.2270.8650.145Age (million years; Sun=4650)485048504850Hydrogen (%; Sun=73.7)71.569.469.5Helium (%; Sun=24.5)25.827.727.8Heavy elements (%; Sun=1.81)2.742.892.90
LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 03-02-07, 16:40   #35
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri

A Candidate for Terrestrial Planets And Intelligent Life


Last Update 15th October '97 - new update currently in preparation Alpha Centauri is a special star - not only because it is the closest stellar system to the sun but also because it is one of the relatively few places in the Milky Way Galaxy that may offer terrestrial life conditions. If humanity looks for intelligent life elsewhere, then Alpha Centauri is an excellent candidate.
Visible only from latitudes south of about 25° the star we call Alpha Centauri lies 4.35 light-years from the Sun. But it is actually a triple star system. The two brightest components Alpha Centauri A and B form a binary. They orbit each other in 80 years with a mean separation of 23 astronomical units (1 astronomical unit = 1 AU = distance between the Sun and Earth). The third member of the system Alpha Centauri C lies 13,000 AU from A and B, or 400 times the distance between the Sun and Neptune. This is so far that it is not known whether Alpha Centauri C is really bound to A and B, or if it will have left the system in some million years. Alpha Centauri C lies measurably closer to us than the other two: It is only 4.22 light-years away, and it is the nearest individual star to the Sun. Because of this proximity, Alpha Centauri C is also called Proxima (Centauri).

Alpha Centauri A is a yellow star with a spectral type of G2, exactly the same as the Sun's. Therefore its temperature and color also match those of the Sun. Alpha Centauri B is an orange star with a spectral type of K1. Whereas Alpha Centauri A and B are stars like the Sun, Proxima is a dim red dwarf with a spectral type of M5 - much fainter, cooler, and smaller than the Sun. Proxima is so faint that astronomers did not discover it until 1915.
The Sun And Its
Nearest Neighbours
Sun Alpha
Centauri A
Alpha
Centauri B
Proxima Color Yellow Yellow Orange Red Spectral type G2 G2 K1 M5 Temperature 5800 K 5800 K 5300 K 2700 K Mass 1.00 1.09 0.90 0.1 Radius 1.00 1.2 0.8 0.2 Brightness 1.00 1.54 0.44 0.00006 Distance
(light-years) 0.00 4.35 4.35 4.22 Age
(billion years) 4.6 5 - 6 5 - 6 ~1?
Alpha Centauri is a special place, because it may offer life conditions similar to our solar system. A star must pass five tests before we can call it a promising place for terrestrial life as we know it. Most stars in the Galaxy would fail. In the case of Alpha Centauri, however, we see that Alpha Centauri A passes all five tests, Alpha Centauri B passes either all but one, and only Proxima Centauri flunks out.
The first criterion is to ensure a star's maturity and stability, which means it has to be on the main sequence. Main-sequence stars fuse hydrogen into helium at their cores, generating light and heat. Because hydrogen is so abundant in stars, most of them stay on the main sequence a long time, giving life a chance to evolve. The Sun and all three components of Alpha Centauri pass this test.
The second test is much tougher, however, we want the star to have the right spectral type, because this determines how much energy a star emits. The hotter stars - those with spectral types O, B, A, and early F - are no good because they burn out fast and die quickly. The cooler stars - those with spectral types M and late K - may not produce enough energy to sustain life, for instance they may not permit the existance of liquid water on their planets. Between the stars that are too hot and those that are too cool, we find the stars that are just right. As our existance proves, yellow G-type stars like the Sun can give rise to life. Late (cool) F stars and early (hot) K stars may be fine too. Luckily, Alpha Centauri A passes this test with bravour, as it is of the same class as our Sun. Alpha Centauri B is a K1 star, so it is hotter and brighter than most K stars, therefore it may pass this test or it may not. And the red dwarf Proxima Centauri seems to be a hopeless case.
For the third test, a system must demonstrate stable conditions. The star's brightness must not vary so much that the star would alternately freeze and fry any life that does manage to develop around it. But because Alpha Centauri A and B form a binary pair there's a further issue. How much does the light received by the planets of one star vary as the other star revolves around it ? During their 80-year orbit, the separation between A and B changes from 11 AU to 35 AU. As viewed from the planets of one star, the brightness of the other increases as the stars approach and decreases as the stars recede. Fortunately, the variation is too small to matter, and Alpha Centauri A and B pass this test. However, Proxima fails this test, too. Like many red dwarfs it is a flare star, prone to outbursts that cause its light to double or triple in just a few minutes.
The fourth condition concerns the stars' ages. The Sun is about 4.6 billion years old, so on Earth life had enough time to develop. A star must be old enough to give life a chance to evolve. Remarkably, Alpha Centauri A and B are even older than the Sun, they have an age of 5 to 6 billion years, therefore they pass this test with glamour, too. Proxima, however, may be only a billion years or so old, then it fails this test, too.
And the fifth and final test: Do the stars have enough heavy elements - such as carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and iron - that biological life needs ? Like most stars, the Sun is primarily hydrogen and helium, but 2 percent of the Sun's weight is metals. (Astronomers call all elements heavier than helium "metals".) Although 2 percent may not sound a lot, it is enough to build rocky planets and to give rise to us. And again, fortunately, Alpha Centauri A and B pass this test. They are metal-rich stars.
Now to the final question. Do we find at Alpha Centauri warm, rocky planets like Earth, full of liquid water ? Unfortunately, we don't know yet whether Alpha Centauri even has planets or not. What we know is that in a binary system the planets must not be too far away from a particular star, or else their orbits become unstable. If the distance exceeds about one fifth of the closest approach of the two stars then the second member of the binary star fatally disturbes the orbit of the planet. For the binary Alpha Centauri A and B, their closest approach is 11 AU, so the limit for planetary orbits is at about 2 astronomical units. Comparing with our system, we see that both Alpha Centauri A and B might hold four inner planets like we have Mercury (0.4 AU), Venus (0.7 AU), Earth (1 AU) and Mars (1.5 AU). Therefore, both Alpha Centauri A and B might have one or two planets in the life zone where liquid water is possible.
Terrestrial Life Conditions:
Questions for Any Star
Sun Alpha
Centauri A
Alpha
Centauri B
Proxima On the main sequence ? Yes Yes Yes Yes Of the right spectral type ? Yes Yes Maybe No Constant in brightness ? Yes Yes Yes No Old enough ? Yes Yes Yes No? Rich in metals ? Yes Yes Yes ? Has stable planetary orbits ? Yes Yes Yes Yes Could planets form ? Yes ? ? Yes Do planets actually exist ? Yes ? ? ? Small rocky planets possible ? Yes Yes Yes Yes? Planets in the life zone ? Yes Maybe Maybe No
LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 03-02-07, 16:42   #36
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

Project Longshot is a design for an interstellar spacecraft, an unmanned probe intended to fly to Alpha Centauri powered by nuclear pulse propulsion. Developed by the US Naval Academy and NASA, Longshot was designed to be built at the Space Station Alpha, the much larger precursor to the existing International Space Station. Unlike the somewhat similar Project Daedalus, Longshot was designed solely using existing technology, although some development would be required.
Unlike Daedalus' closed-cycle fusion engine, Longshot would use a long-lived nuclear fission reactor for power. Initially generating 300 kilowatts, the reactor would power a number of lasers in the engine that would be used to ignite inertial confinement fusion similar to that in Daedalus. The main design difference is that Daedalus would rely on the fusion reaction being able to power the ship as well, whereas in Longshot the external reactor would provide this power.
The reactor would also be used to power a laser for communications back to Earth, with a maximum power of 250 kilowatts. For most of the journey this would be used at a much lower power for sending data about the interstellar medium, but during the flyby the main engine section would be discarded and the entire power dedicated to communications at about 1 kilobit per second.
Longshot would mass 396 Metric tonnes at the start of the mission, including 264 tonnes of Helium-3/Deuterium pellet fuel/propellant. The active mission payload which includes the fission reactor but not the discarded main propulsion section would mass around 30 tons.
A notable difference in the mission architecture between Longshot and the Daedalus study is that Longshot would go into orbit about the target star while Daedalus would do a one shot fly-by lasting a comparatively short time.
The journey to Alpha Centauri B orbit would take about 100 years and another 4.39 years would be necessary for the data to reach Earth.

[edit] Reference

Beals, K. A., M. Beaulieu, F. J. Dembia, J. Kerstiens, D. L. Kramer, J. R. West and J. A. Zito. Project Longshot: An Unmanned Probe To Alpha Centauri. U S Naval Academy. NASA-CR-184718. 1988.

[edit] External link
LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Links Sponsorizzati
Telescopi Artesky
Vecchio 03-02-07, 18:20   #37
Planezio
Utente Esperto
 
L'avatar di Planezio
 
Data di registrazione: Jan 2003
Messaggi: 2,763
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

Quote:
LongJohnVargas
In Italia non sanno gestire l'energia. Ci sono scienziati straordinari ma lo stato non permette lo svilupo di progetti energetici. Non lo promuove, anzi lo ostacola, per i motivi che conosciamo bene, ovvero "pagano meglio le tangenti le industrie già esistenti rispeto a quelle che ancora non esistono".

Fuori dall'Italia le cose son diverse. I motori a curvatura ancora non vengono presi in considerazione, ma ad esempio il motore ad Americio di Carlo Rubbia mi pare un progetto solido, seppure esistente solo a livello di progetazione. Pero sai ci sono centrali nucleari che producono energia. Potrebbero produrne anche per mandare un pompelmo in orbita plutoniana. Non mi sembra così strano.

cioè i reattori nucleari non sono neppure in grado di sollevarsi dal suolo da soli, però possono fare l'energia per ecc. ecc.
Anche l'eolica e la fotovoltaica producono energia, anche le biomasse, potremmo utilizzarle per andare su alfa centauri....
E poi in questo topic, mi pare, la congiura delle multinazionali mancava, ma gira e rigira poi alla fine è uscita.
P.S. tempo fa aiutai, per quel che potevo, uno studente nello sviluppo dello studio di una stazione sulla Luna. Comprendeva anche una palestra "centrifuga" per impedire la decalcificazione ossea, era studiata molto bene. L'unica cosa non consideratra, ovviamente, era come portare le centomila tonnellate di materiale sulla Luna. Se fosse stata pubblicata in inglese, sono convinto che qualcuno "libero dai condizionamenti" l'avrebbe postata qui, dicendo che era un progetto boicottato da qualcuno.
Un discorso di fantascienza, solo perche è scritto in inglese, non diventa un discorso di scienza. Anche la parola "fanta" ha una sua traduzione....

Ultima modifica di Planezio : 04-02-07 13:28.
Planezio non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 04-02-07, 10:13   #38
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

Quote:
Planezio
cioè i reattori nucleari non sono nepure in grado i soollevarsi dal suolo da soli, possono fare l'energia per ecc. ecc.
Anche l'eolica e la fotovoltaica producono energia, anche le biomasse, potremmo utilizzarle per andare su alfa centauri....
E poi in questo topic, mio pare, la congiura delle multinazionakli mancava, ma gira e rigira poi alla fine è uscita.
P.S. tempo fa aiutai, per quel che potevo, uno studente anello sviluppo dello studio di nua stazione sulla Luna. Cionmprendeva anche una palesttra "centrifga" per impedire la decalcificazione ossea, era studiata molto bene. Lì'unica cosa nonm consideratra, ovviamente, era come portare le centomilòa tonnellate di m,ateriale syulla Luna. Se foss estat pubblicata in inglese, sono convinto che qualcuno "libero dai condizionamenti" l'avrebbe postata quim, dicendo che era un rpogetto boicottato da qualcuno.
Un discorso di fantascienza, solo perche è scritto inionglese, nmo diventa ujn discorso di scienza. Anchje la parola "fanta" ha una sua traduzione....


Mi complimento con te per l'aiuto dato allo studente in questione. Penso che non si possa spendere tempo in miglior modo che lavorare su tali progetti.

Sapiamo benissimo che ancora nessun reattore nucleare ha mai spinto un razzo fuori dall'orbita terrestre, ma non venirmi a dire che non siamo in grado di farlo. Se ancora non è stato fatto è a causa degli accordi internazionali che ne limitano l'uso a causa dei pericoli generati dal nucleare. E sapiamo tutti che il problema è reale. Infatti potrei essere il primo a contestare l'uso del nucleare sulla terra.

Ciò on significa che non possa essere usata fuori dall'orbita terrestre. Oggi poi l'energia nucleare viene controllata meglio che in passato. Quindi le domande che pongo sono queste e vi prego di prenderle sul serio se vi va di rispondere.

1. La NASA sta sul serio costruendo un veicolo per portare astronauti sulla Luna?

2. La NASA ha veramente inprogramma di costruire una base sulla LUna?

3. Se la NASA costruisce una base sulla Luna, c'è posto dopo le prime infrastrutre per lo sviluppo di moduli agiuntivi alla base o nelle vicinanze della base?

4. Possono essere usati moduli identici a quelli della ISS, logicamente con le oportune modifiche, in modo da non perdere tempo con nuove progetazioni, per ingrandire la base lunare americana?

5. C'è posto per l'Italia o per l'Europa nello svilupo futuro della base lunare?

6. C'è posto per i privati nello sviluppo della base lunare?

7. Dopo la costruzione della base sarebbe logico progettare e programmare la costruzione di una rampa di lancio sulla Luna, usando materie prime lunari?

8. Gli ambientalisti si lamenterebbero anche della contaminazione nucleare sulla Luna o pensano solo alla Terra?

Mi piacerebbe vedere risposte critiche in merito, certo, ma allo stesso tempo anche delle risposte costrutive.

LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 04-02-07, 10:45   #39
LongJohnVargas
Utente Junior
 
Data di registrazione: Oct 2005
Messaggi: 161
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

Appello degli scienziati al Congresso
Più scienza per gli Stati Uniti


La qualità dell'insegnamento delle scienze e della matematica negli USA sarebbe insoddisfacente

PAROLE CHIAVE
Cultura scientifica Educazione





Più della metà dei cittadini statunitensi si dichiara insoddisfatta per la qualità dell'insegnamento delle scienze e della matematica negli USA, che non sarebbe in grado di tenere il passo con quello di altre nazioni. Lo rivela un ampio sondaggio eseguito da Research!America, un'organizzazioneche federa numerosi enti di ricerca, fra cui la National Science Fundation. Nonostante gli Stati Uniti siano ancora in vetta alle classifiche delle nazioni che producono il maggior numero di brevetti e di articoli scientifici, si sta dunque diffondendo l'impressione che questa leadership - essenziale secondo il 97 per cento degli intervistati affinché la nazione possa conservare la propria posizione dominante in campo economico, politico e militare a livello globale - possa avviarsi al declino.
La cosa sarebbe confermata dal fatto che, mentre un numero sempre maggiore di articoli di ricerca statunitensi ha come primo firmatario qualche ricercatore formatosi in altri paesi, ben il 75 per cento degli interrogati dal sondaggio non è in grado di fare il nome di uno scienziato vivente, nonostante l'87 per cento di essi ritenga che quella scientifica possa essere considerata una delle carriere più prestigiose.
"Secondo l'opinione pubblica americana, gli Stati Uniti devono provvedere a sviluppare politiche e a fornire maggiori finanziamenti ai settori, pubblici e privati, impeganti nella ricerca", ha dichiarato Mary Woolley, presidente di Research!America. Per questo Research!America, attraverso la NSF ha deciso di presentare un appello al Congresso perché venga prestata maggiore attenzione al problema nei futuri indirizzi di politica dell'educazione e della ricerca. (gg)
LongJohnVargas non in linea   Rispondi citando
Vecchio 04-02-07, 13:44   #40
Planezio
Utente Esperto
 
L'avatar di Planezio
 
Data di registrazione: Jan 2003
Messaggi: 2,763
Predefinito Re: Alpha Centauri

allora forse non ci siamo capiti.
Quello per cui ho aiutato lo studente, letteralmente:
NON PUO' ESSERE DEFINITO PROGETTO!
E' solo un gioco, una esercitazione, che dice cosa si potrebbe fare, SE FOSSE POSSIBILE farlo!
Ma non lo è!
Ti faccio un altro esempio:
Tanti anni fa, mi divertii per un po' a studiare cosa sarebbe successo se avessi inventato una batteria capace di accunmulare cento kiliowattora al kg.... Cioè mille volte meglio delle batterie migliori esistenti.
Giocando, arrivai persino a calcolare i costi di ammortamento, trasporto, come ed a che prezzo venderle, le modalità della vendita, gli utili, anche il dividendo agli azionisti. Ci giocai, come esercitazione, per un sacco di tempo. Come e dove produrre corrente, (in Africa, e con il calore residuo dissalare acqua per irrigare), ecc. ecc.
Però era un gioco. Definirlo progetto, sarebbe stato ridicolo, perchè la batteria in questione NON ESISTE!
Cioè: la stazione sulla luna è un gioco, definirla priogetto è pura fantasia, perchè
Non abbiamo la MINIMA idea di come portare centomila tonnellate sulla luna!
Non ne abbiamo proprio la più pallida idea. Il nucleare otrebbe, se tutto andasse bene,. aumnetare cinque/dieci volte le nostre capacità: Da due a dieci/venti tonnellate. Saremmo ancora cinque/diecimila volte sotto!
CINQUEMILA/DIECIMILA..... Ed ammesso che il nucleare funzioni. Altrimenti,
CINQUANTAMILA....

P.S. non ti offendere, ma se i fondi a disposizione non solo della ricerca, ma della diffusione della scienza tra il pubblico fossero moltiplicati in quantità ed in efficacia, uno dei risultati sarebbe che meno gente confonderebbe la pura fantasia con la scienza.....

Ultima modifica di Planezio : 04-02-07 14:11.
Planezio non in linea   Rispondi citando
Rispondi


Links Sponsorizzati
Geoptik

Strumenti della discussione
Modalità  di visualizzazione

Regole di scrittura
Tu non puoi inserire i messaggi
Tu non puoi rispondere ai messaggi
Tu non puoi inviare gli allegati
Tu non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi

codice vB è Attivo
smilies è Attivo
[IMG] il codice è Attivo
Il codice HTML è Disattivato


Tutti gli orari sono GMT. Attualmente sono le 20:29.


Powered by vBulletin versione 3.6.7
Copyright ©: 2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Traduzione italiana a cura di: vBulletinItalia.it